In their endorsement editorial, the Financial Times described themselves (behind a paywall) thusly (via Guido Fawkes)…

This publication stands for a liberal agenda: a small state, free trade, free markets and social justice.

That would surprise those of us who know it by its rampant Europhilia (indeed, as Guido himself notes, “Quite a few FT readers will be horrified to see their paper backing Brexit and endorsing the Tories”).

While the FT probably wouldn’t support GF’s interpretation of their decision, the fact is only Ms. May (among the leaders of parties contesting everywhere in the UK) has promised to leave the Single Market; only Ms. May has promised to leave the customs union; and only Ms. May has said she’s willing to take no deal over “a bad deal.” One would have thought such a position would have lead the FT to remain neutral, or maybe back the Lib Dems.

Instead…

The alternative to Mrs May is worse. Mr Corbyn is a fringe figure who has spent his entire political career in opposition — to his own Labour leadership. Despite his recent media makeover, he is a pacifist relic of the 1970s, in hock to the trade unions, with no grip on economic issues. It is no accident that the arrival of Mr Corbyn and his hard-left supporters in mainstream politics has coincided with a revival of anti-Semitism and misogyny. Labour’s team are unfit for government, let alone the delicate Brexit talks. The Liberal Democrats have failed to make an impact with their pledge of a second EU referendum…

Faced with such uncertainty at home and abroad, Mrs May is the safer bet.

Now, newspaper endorsements are hardly as important as they used to be, but with this election now in such a state that even pollsters are confused – YouGov is now saying May would lose her majority; Kantar has the Conservatives up 10 and thus with a larger majority while Panelbase has it, for now, at a landslide (US News and World Report) – every little bit helps for the Tories.

T-minus 8 days.